TAP Coach

Search for glossary terms (regular expression allowed)
Begin with Contains Exact termSounds like
Term Definition
Memorandum of Agreement

Beginning in 1977 and renewed a few times since that date, the New York State agencies involved in the administration of State student financial assistance programs have endorsed a Memorandum of Agreement. The Memorandum sets forth the responsibilities of each agency with respect to financial aid oversight as well as the obligations of each agency to the other parties to the Agreement.

The signatories to the Memorandum of Agreement are the State Education Department, the Higher Education Services Corporation, the Office of the State Comptroller, and the Division of the Budget.

Provisions in the Memorandum form the basis for the State Comptroller’s audit of institutional adherence to law, rules and regulations. The Memorandum also provides that the State Education Department shall maintain a list of programs approved for State student aid that shall be made available to the State Comptroller and the Higher Education Services Corporation.

Minimum Course Load

The Regulations of the Commissioner of Education define full-time and part-time study for financial aid purposes.

Full-time study is defined in section 145-2.1(a) of the regulations as enrollment in credit-bearing courses applicable to the students' program of study, for at least 12 semester hours for a semester of not less than 15 weeks or 100 calendar days, inclusive of examination periods (or eight semester hours a quarter). The minimum full-time course load, then, is 12 semester hours.

If a student wishes to take courses that are not required for the student’s program, then the student must take those courses over and above the minimum 12 semester hour course load. This is important when determining whether the student has maintained good academic standing, as only courses that are applicable to the student’s program of study can be considered.

Minimum Standards

Regulations of the Commissioner of Education enacted in 1981 adopted specific criteria for determining good academic standing. As specified in section 145-2.2, each institution seeking to participate in State student financial aid programs is required to establish and apply “a standard of satisfactory academic progress which includes required levels of achievement to be measured at stated intervals. Criteria for achievement shall include, but need not be limited to: (i) the minimum number of credits earned, or courses successfully completed at each interval; and (ii) the minimum cumulative grade point average or similar measure at each interval.” 

Prior to implementing the standard(s) of progress, as well as any subsequent changes, each institution is required to obtain the approval of the Commissioner of Education.

These requirements for good academic standing as defined by the Commissioner continue in effect for students who receive their first State award during the 1981-82 academic year through academic year 2005-2006. 

For first-time recipients in academic year 2006-2007 and thereafter, the New York State Legislature amended the Education Law to specify the satisfactory academic progress standards to be used by all institutions. Thus, the required minimum standards for determining award eligibility are now mandated by law for all students who are first time, full-time students in 2006-2007 and thereafter.

The New York State Legislature mandated additional changes to the minimum standards in 2011. Effective for the 2010-11 academic year and thereafter, New York State Education Law requires a non-remedial student, whose first award year is in 2010--11 and thereafter, must meet new standards of satisfactory academic progress (SAP). Non-remedial students whose first year is 2007-08 through 2009-10 must meet the SAP requirements enacted in 2006. Those meeting the definition of "remedial student" are not subject to the new SAP standards, but will use the requirements established in 2006. 

Students who received their first State award prior to that date continue to be bound by the standards approved by the Commissioner for their institutions. An institution can choose to adopt the standards mandated in Education Law for all students in lieu of maintaining and applying two sets of standards. In that case, the institution needs to make a request to the State Education Department seeking Commissioner's approval of revised standards, i.e., the standards established in Education Law.

Noncredit Study

Regulations of the Commissioner of Education permits the inclusion of noncredit or remedial study in determining whether a student satisfies the requirements for full-time or part-time study.

As stated in the regulation, “. . . noncredit or remedial courses may . . . be considered as contributing toward full-time or part-time study on an hour-for-hour equivalent basis, if the student effort required is the same as would be required for a credit-bearing course in conformity with subdivision (o) of section 50.1 of this Title [defining a semester hour of credit], and if required or approved by the school, in a plan of study prefiled by the student with the school, as an integral part of the student’s program.”

The regulation also specifies limitations on remedial study: “Effective for academic terms beginning after January 1, 1978, a student carrying a full-time program that includes noncredit remedial courses shall carry at least six semester hours a semester, except that in the first semester of study, such a student need carry only three semester hours. Effective for academic terms beginning on or after July 1, 1984, a student carrying a part-time program that includes noncredit remedial courses shall carry at least three semester hours a semester. A combination of such credit and remedial work shall equal the minimum student effort requirement for full-time study or part-time study, respectively, in nonremedial programs.”

The reference in the regulation to the “first semester of study” means the student’s first semester of college-level study, not the first semester at a particular institution.

It should be noted that although the regulation permits a student to take up to half the minimum full-time or part-time course load in noncredit remedial study in each semester, at a certain point satisfactory academic progress credit accrual requirements will limit the number of noncredit remedial courses a student can include and still meet those credit accrual requirements.

NYS Math and Science Teaching Incentive Scholarships

The NYS Math and Science Teaching Incentive Program is offered to encourage students to pursue careers as math and science teachers in secondary education (grades 7-12). Awards are made to students attending school at the undergraduate and/or graduate degree level in exchange for five years of full-time employment as math or science teachers in secondary education in NYS.

Eligibility

NOTE: If you are a high school senior you may not apply at this time.  You may apply in January of your first year of college.

An applicant must:

  • be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen;
  • be attending a college located in NYS;
  • be matriculated in an approved undergraduate or graduate program full-time at a degree-granting institution in NYS leading to a career as a math or science teacher in secondary education;
  • have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 or higher;
  • not be a recipient of an award under the NYS Masters-in-Education Teacher Incentive Scholarship Program;
  • execute a Service Contract agreeing to work full-time for five years as a math or science teacher in secondary education in NYS. View the terms and conditions of the service contract;
  • be in a non-default status on a student loan made under any NYS or federal education loan program or repayment of any NYS award; and
  • be in compliance with the terms of any service condition imposed by NYS a award.

Award Amount

A recipient receives an annual award payment for full-time study equal to the annual tuition charged to a NYS resident student attending an undergraduate program at the State University of New York (SUNY), or actual tuition charged, whichever is less. For the 2016-17 academic year, the standard SUNY tuition rate is $6,470.

Note: Any award payment received may have tax implications. Any questions regarding potential tax implications should be directed to a tax professional, the Internal Revenue Service, or the NYS Department of Taxation and Finance.

Duration

A recipient is entitled to annual award payments for not more than four academic years of full-time undergraduate study and one academic year of full-time graduate study while matriculated in an approved program leading to permanent certification as a math or science teacher in secondary education.

How to Apply

Complete and submit the NYS Math & Science Teaching Incentive Web Application. Be sure to print the Web Application Confirmation, sign the application and submit it, along with the required documentation, according to the instructions.

The deadline for filing an application for submitting the NYS Math & Science Teaching Incentive Web Application is March 1, 2017.

Recipient Selection

New applicants will be ranked by GPA and total credits earned. In the event there are more eligible applicants than available funding, awards will be paid according to rank.

Payment

A recipient is not required to submit another NYS Math and Science Teaching Incentive Program Web Application once awarded this scholarship, but must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the Payment of State Grants, Scholarships and Awards Application each year to receive payment. A recipient seeking payment who is not a resident of NYS may contact the HESC Scholarship Unit at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 888-697-4372 to request a Scholarship and Grant Payment Application.

Awards will be paid directly to the colleges on behalf of students upon the successful completion of each academic year.

NOTE: An applicant may attend less than full time during the last undergraduate or graduate year if less than a full-time course load is necessary to complete the degree.

Questions?

Please contact the Scholarship Unit at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 888-697-4372 with questions about this Program.

Opportunity Program (Five-Year Program)

For financial aid purposes, there are two types of five-year programs that can entitle an undergraduate student to an additional year of State financial assistance.

According to section 661 of the Education Law, an undergraduate student is eligible for up to four years of undergraduate assistance unless the student is enrolled in an approved five-year program, in which case the student is eligible for five years of undergraduate assistance. 

This section of the Law is implemented by section 145-2.7 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education. A student enrolled in an academic program that requires five years to complete and that the State Education Department has registered as a five-year program is eligible for a fifth year of undergraduate assistance. Examples are certain architecture or engineering programs. “Three Plus Two” programs that combine three years of liberal arts plus two years of a specialization are not considered five-year programs but rather a five-year pathway to a degree that normally takes four years to complete.

The second type of eligible five-year program is one that is an organized program of remedial study approved by the Commissioner. These include the Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP), the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP), the Search for Education, Elevation and Knowledge (SEEK) program, and the College Discovery (CD) program. Students accepted in an opportunity program are considered matriculated on that basis and are eligible for TAP but, in accordance with statute, are not eligible for STAP. An opportunity program student who is enrolled in a second bachelor's degree program is not eligible for a fifth year of TAP. 

Commissioner’s approval for the fifth year of payments applies to all academic performance and general purpose awards for which a fifth-year payment is authorized. 

Note: A fifth year of undergraduate assistance reduces a student’s statutory eligibility for four years of graduate award eligibility to three years. (Effective with the 2010-11 award year, graduate TAP funds have been eliminated. Graduate awards for the Veterans Tuition Award and the Senator Patricia K. McGee Nursing Faculty scholarship continue to be funded)

Out-of-State Study

State student financial assistance is provided for students who meet eligibility criteria, including attendance at an eligible institution located in New York State.

Under certain circumstances, as specified in section 145-2.5 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education, a student may be eligible for a State award when studying in another state or another country.

As defined in the regulation, “to be considered in attendance at a school in New York State, the student must either be matriculated at that school, or must be registered at that school under permit from another school in New York State at which the student is regularly matriculated.”

If the student receives instruction at an out-of-state school, the instruction may be considered as in-state study “only if the student is required to pay all tuition and instructional fees for such foreign or out-of-state study to the approved New York State institution.”

The regulation further specifies that “To be approved, an off-campus study program must be an integral part of the curriculum of the New York State institution, and tuition must be payable to the school and received by the school in the same manner as tuition charged for any other school program. If the student pays tuition or educational fees to an out-of-state institution, the student shall be considered as receiving instruction provided by that institution, notwithstanding the fact that the student may be maintaining registration in a New York State institution, or that the New York State institution may also be charging the student a fee for supervisory, guidance, or administrative services.”

Typical eligible foreign study programs are “junior year abroad” programs, where a student studies in a foreign country for a year or semester and the study is fully applicable to the student’s degree requirements at the New York State institution where the student is matriculated. The student maintains matriculation during the overseas study.

Another example of eligible out-of-state study is a semester or year of study offered and conducted by a New York State institution in another state or country. 

To be acceptable for state award purposes, the institution where the student is matriculated must give prior approval for the out of state or foreign study and the courses completed must be applicable to the student's degree requirements. In order to certify eligibility for State financial aid, the matriculating institution must receive all grades and tuition costs from the school attended.

Part-time Study

Section 145-2.1(a) of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education defines part-time study for general awards (other than Veterans Tuition Awards and Aid for Part-Time Study) and for academic performance awards (scholarships) as “enrollment for at least 6, but fewer than 12, semester hours or the equivalent for a semester of not less than 15 weeks, inclusive of examination periods; or at least 4, but fewer than 8, semesters hours a quarter.”

For Veterans Tuition Awards and Aid for Part-Time Study, the minimum part-time course load is three semester hours. Three semester hours is also the minimum part-time course load for ADA Part-Time TAP. A student who is receiving aid through one of these programs and is taking remedial courses will have to take at least three semester hours of credit-bearing work in addition to the remedial study to be eligible.

Part-time TAP

New legislation enacted in 2006 created a Part-time TAP program, effective for the 2007-08 academic year. Part-time undergraduate students at approved institutions in New York State who were first-time freshman in academic year 2006-07 or thereafter, may be eligible for Part-time TAP to help pay for college beginning in the summer of 2007. Students who have attended college and/or received TAP prior to academic year 2006-07 are ineligible. 

Part-time TAP is an entitlement program that uses up TAP eligibility (a maximum of 48 points for four years of full-time or eight years of part-time undergraduate study or 60 points for students enrolled in approved five-year programs).

Approved institutions include the campuses of the State University and the City University of New York and not-for-profit independent degree-granting colleges and universities. Students attending proprietary degree-granting institutions are not eligible.

In addition to the general eligibility criteria that apply to all State award programs, certain requirements are specific to the Part-time TAP program. To be eligible, students must:

  • Be matriculated and enrolled in an approved undergraduate program at SUNY, CUNY, or an independent (not-for-profit) NYS institution
  • Be enrolled for at least 6 but fewer than 12 semester hour credits or the equivalent
  • Have earned 12 credits in each of two consecutive prior semesters (credits from New York State not-for-profit institutions only); a full-time summer term can be used to meet the prior study requirement
  • Maintain a C average and meet good academic standing requirements
  • Meet income eligibility limitations (income limits are the same as for TAP)

A student must meet the 24-semester credit prior study requirement only once to be eligible for Part-time TAP.

A Part-time TAP award is calculated using the student's actual part-time tuition charge and the number of credits taken.

Note: The “C average” for Part-time TAP is an eligibility requirement that cannot be waived using the C average waiver.

 
Payment Points

The NYS Higher Education Services Corporation maintains records of student TAP awards by assigning points for each payment. A full semester TAP award equals six (6) payment points; a trimester or quarter award equals four (4) payment points; and a half-time award equals three (3) payment points. PT TAP and PT VTA points will reflect prorated points based on the certified number of credits a student is enrolled in.

As provided in Education Law, an undergraduate student has a total of four years (or a total of 48 points) of award eligibility or five years (or 60 points) if enrolled in an approved five-year program.

Program Changes

College academic programs are eligible for State student aid based on the State Education Department’s review and approval, resulting in program registration. The Department maintains an Inventory of Registered Programs of all approved programs and indicates financial aid eligibility for each one.

Colleges must offer registered programs as approved for the programs to continue to be eligible for financial aid. When conducting financial aid audits, the Office of the State Comptroller reviews catalogs and may question if a program appears to have changed and is no longer being offered as approved.

Because of possible audit problems, it is important, therefore, for colleges to seek State Education Department approval of any program changes in a timely way. The change can be as simple as a new title or a more substantive change in content.

Information about procedures for submitting a request for approval of program changes is available from the State Education Department.

Program Pursuit

To remain eligible for State student financial assistance, a student must remain in good academic standing. Two elements make up good academic standing: making satisfactory academic progress toward a degree and pursuing the program of study. 

Program pursuit is defined in regulations as completing—getting a grade in--a percentage of the minimum full-time course load in each term an award is received. The percentage, as specified in regulations, begins at 50 percent of the minimum full-time course load in each term of the first year an award is received, to 75 percent in each term of the second year an award is received, to 100 percent in each term of the third year an award is received and thereafter.

Pursuit is an effort or completion requirement rather than an achievement requirement, so courses in which a student receives either passing or failing grades can be used to satisfy the pursuit requirement. Thus, grades of A through F and any other grade that indicates the student completed the course and all necessary assignments (e.g., P, S, U, R) are acceptable to meet the pursuit requirement. W grades or any grade which indicates the student failed to complete the course or assignments cannot be used to satisfy the pursuit requirement. Incomplete (I) grades can be used to meet the pursuit requirement providing college policy requires the grade to be resolved to a passing or failing grade no later than the end of the subsequent term. 

Grades earned in remedial courses as well as credit-bearing courses can be included in meeting the pursuit requirement.

Progress Chart (Satisfactory Academic Progress)

For financial aid purposes, good academic standing consists of two elements: satisfactory academic progress and pursuit of program. Satisfactory progress is a measure of the student’s achievement, of earning credits toward a degree or certificate with a specified grade point average. Pursuit of program is a measure of the student’s effort to complete a program.

In accordance with section 145-2.2 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education, each institution participating in State student financial aid programs must determine whether a student is in good academic standing based on a standard of satisfactory academic progress comprising a minimum number of credits to be accrued (earned) with a minimum cumulative grade point average in each term an award payment is received. The progress standard is most clearly presented in chart format (see below). 

Initially, the regulation provided that each institution establish and submit for the Commissioner’s approval its proposed standard of progress. However, for the 1995-96 academic year and thereafter, new legislation mandated a minimum cumulative C average after a student has received four full-time semester award payments or the equivalent (24 payment points). 

Effective for the 2010-11 academic year and thereafter, New York State Education Law requires a non-remedial student, whose first award year is in 2010--11 and thereafter, must meet new standards of satisfactory academic progress (SAP). Non-remedial students whose first year is 2007-08 through 2009-10 must meet the SAP requirements enacted in 2006. Those meeting the definition of "remedial student" are not subject to the new SAP standards, but will use the requirements established in 2006. The law enacted in 2006 mandated minimum standards of satisfactory academic progress for students receiving their first State award in academic year 2006-07 year. 

Standard of Satisfactory Academic Progress
for the Purpose of Determining Eligibility for State Student Aid

Effective 2010-11 for non-remedial students receiving first NYS award payment in 2010-11 and thereafter. Remedial students and students enrolled in an approved certificate program will use the 2006 SAP charts.

Program: Baccalaureate Program
Calendar: Semester 2010-11 and thereafter (non-remedial students)
Before Being Certified for This Payment 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th
A Student Must Have Accrued at Least This Many Credits O 6 15 27 39 51 66 81 96 111
With At Least This Grade Point Average O 1.5 1.8 1.8 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

 

Programs: Associate Program
Calendar: Semester 2010-11 and thereafter (non-remedial students)
Before Being Certified for This Payment 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
A Student Must Have Accrued at Least This Many Credits O 6 15 27 39 51
With at Least This Grade Point Average O 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.0 2.0

 

Program: Baccalaureate Program
Calendar: Trimester 2010-11 and thereafter (non-remedial students) - C average must be met by 6th payment
Before Being Certified for This Payment 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th
A Student Must Have Accrued at Least This Many Credits O 4 8 14 22 30 38 46 56 66 76 86 96 106 116
With at Least This Grade Point Average O 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.8 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

 

Program: Associate Program
Calendar: Trimester 2010-11 and thereafter (non-remedial students) - C average must be met by 7th payment
Before Being Certified for This Payment 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th
A Student Must Have Accrued at Least This Many Credits O 2 6 14 22 30 38 46 54
With At Least This Grade Point Average 0 1.0 1.3 1.5 1.5 1.8 2.0 2.0 2.0



Note: The 2011-12 enacted NYS budget mandates the following standards of progress, enacted in 2006-07, shall be used for non-remedial students who first receive State aid in 2007-08 through 2009-10 and for students who meet the definition of "remedial student" in 2010-11 and thereafter. The enacted budget defines remedial for purposes of SAP. 

Standard of Satisfactory Academic Progress
for the Purpose of Determining Eligibility for State Student Aid

Effective 2006-07

Program: Baccalaureate Program
Calendar: Semester 2006-07, 2007-08 through 2009-10 and 2010-11 and thereafter remedial students (if a student's first award was in 2010-11 and thereafter, and he/she does not meet the definition of a remedial student, see charts for non-remedial students)
Before Being Certified for This Payment 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th
A Student Must Have Accrued at Least This Many Credits O 3 9 21 33 45 60 75 90 105
With At Least This Grade Point Average O 1.1 1.2 1.3 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

 

Program: Associate Program
Calendar: Semester Calendar 2006-07, 2007-08 through 2009-10 and 2010-11 and thereafter remedial students (if a student's first award was in 2010-11 and thereafter, and he/she does not meet the definition of a remedial student, see charts for non-remedial students)
Before Being Certified for This Payment 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
A Student Must Have Accrued at Least This Many Credits O 3 9 18 30 45
With At Least This Grade Point Average O .5 .75 1.3 2.0 2.0

 

Program: Baccalaureate Program
Calendar: Trimester Calendar 2006-07, 2007-08 through 2009-10 and 2010-11 and thereafter remedial students (if a student's first award was in 2010-11 and thereafter, and he/she does not meet the definition of a remedial student, see charts for non-remedial students)
Before Being Certified for This Payment 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th
A Student Must Have Accrued at Least This Many Credits O 2 4 9 17 25 33 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110
With At Least This Grade Point Average O 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.3 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

 

Program: Associate Program
Calendar: Trimester Calendar 2006-07, 2007-08 through 2009-10 and 2010-11 and thereafter remedial students (if a student's first award was in 2010-11 and thereafter, and he/she does not meet the definition of a remedial student, see charts for non-remedial students)
Before Being Certified for This Payment 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th
A Student Must Have Accrued at Least This Many Credits O 2 4 9 15 21 30 37 45
With At Least This Grade Point Average O .5 .5 .75 .75 1.3 2.0 2.0 2.0


Students who received their first award prior to the 2006-07 academic year continue to be subject to the standards of satisfactory academic progress approved by the Commissioner of Education. However, institutions may choose to adopt for all students standards mandated in Education Law by requesting State Education Department approval.

 
Readmitted Student

A readmitted student is a student who is returning to an institution previously attended.

Students who are dismissed and have failed to maintain good academic standing for financial aid purposes may regain eligibility for State student aid upon readmission under the following conditions: the student is returning to college after an absence of at least one calendar year; has not received State financial assistance at another institution; and meets the institution’s academic requirements for readmission. Note: if the student was dismissed for academic reasons but nevertheless met the TAP good academic standing requirements for a subsequent payment, the student is eligible on readmission.

In readmitting a student who has been dismissed for academic reasons, the institution should maintain a record that shows that due consideration has been given to the reasons for the student’s prior loss of good academic standing. Additionally, the institution should determine that the student can benefit from study at the institution and that the institution will provide the instructional and other support the student needs to remedy academic deficiencies and complete the program. 

Students who have lost good academic standing, are absent from school for at least one calendar year, and are then readmitted by the institution may be placed on the chart of satisfactory academic progress based either on the number of credits earned or number of award payments received, whichever is more beneficial to the student. The student is eligible for an award for the first term upon readmission but must then meet the satisfactory academic progress requirements to be eligible for subsequent awards.

A student readmitted to an institution that they attended previously, who has received two or more years of award payments, must have a C average or better to receive further State student aid. The student’s cumulative grade point average would be based on prior grades earned at the institution.

While “beneficial placement” affects a student’s position on the chart of satisfactory academic progress, the student’s pursuit requirement is based on the total number of award payments the student had received, before and after readmission.

Regaining Eligibility

A student who fails to maintain good academic standing for financial aid purposes—for failure to make satisfactory academic progress or failure to pursue or both—loses eligibility for a subsequent award.

Section 145-2.2 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education specifies that “Following a determination that the recipient of an award has lost good academic standing, further payments under the award shall be suspended until the student is restored to good academic standing by either:

    (i) pursuing the program of study in which he is enrolled and making satisfactory progress toward the completion of his program’s academic requirements for a period of one term; or
    (ii) establishing in some other way, to the satisfaction of the commissioner, evidence of his ability to successfully complete an approved program.”

In practice, there are four ways by which a student who has lost good academic standing can regain eligibility:

    (1) make up deficiencies without benefit of State student aid (as specified in subparagraph (i) above). For example, if a student was at the 75 percent pursuit level but received a grade in only six semester hours rather than the nine hours needed, the student can take and complete at least a three-credit course and make up the deficiency to regain eligibility;
    (2) apply for and be granted a waiver in accordance with the institution’s established waiver policy;
    (3) be readmitted to the institution after an absence of at least one calendar year (and without receiving State student aid at another institution) by meeting the institution’s academic requirements for readmission. (Note: if a student has met the TAP standard of satisfactory academic progress but is academically dismissed based on an institution’s academic standard that is higher than the TAP minimum, the student is eligible for State student aid immediately upon return, regardless of the length of the student’s absence from the institution.);
    (4) transfer to another institution where the student must meet the new institution’s admission requirements.


A student cannot regain eligibility by changing programs within an institution. Such students can regain eligibility only by being granted a waiver, by making up deficiencies at their own expense, or by being readmitted to the institution after an absence of at least one calendar year.